GAO Report: Nursing Home Infection Control Deficiencies “Widespread And Persistent” Before COVID-19

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (“GAO”) reported: “Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, we found that most nursing homes were cited for infection prevention and control deficiencies (82% of those surveyed from 2013-2017). About half of these homes had persistent problems and were cited across multiple years.”

“GAO analysis of CMS data shows that infection prevention and control deficiencies were the most common type of deficiency cited in surveyed nursing homes, with most nursing homes having an infection prevention and control deficiency cited in one or more years from 2013 through 2017 (13,299 nursing homes, or 82 percent of all surveyed homes). In each individual year, we found that about 40 percent of surveyed nursing homes had infection prevention and control deficiencies, and this continued in 2018 and 2019. About half—6,427 of 13,299 (48 percent)—of the nursing homes with an infection prevention and control deficiency had this deficiency cited in multiple consecutive years from 2013 through 2017. This is an indicator of persistent problems at these nursing homes.”

“In each year from 2013 through 2017, nearly all infection prevention and control deficiencies (about 99 percent in each year) were classified by surveyors as not severe, meaning the surveyor determined that residents were not harmed. Our review of CMS data shows that implemented enforcement actions for these deficiencies were typically rare: from 2013 through 2017, CMS implemented enforcement actions for 1 percent of these infection prevention and control deficiencies classified as not severe.”

Source

“An additional 19 percent of the nursing homes (2,563 out of 13,299) had an infection prevention and control deficiency cited in multiple nonconsecutive years … Furthermore, of the 6,427 nursing homes with an infection prevention and control deficiency cited in multiple consecutive years, 35 percent (2,225 nursing homes) had these deficiencies cited in 3 or 4 consecutive years, and 6 percent (411 nursing homes) had these deficiencies cited across all 5 years. At the state level, all states had nursing homes with infection prevention and control deficiencies cited in multiple consecutive years … in each year from 2013 through 2017, nearly all infection prevention and control deficiencies (about 99 percent in each year) were classified by surveyors as not severe, meaning the surveyor determined that residents were not harmed … 67 percent of these infection prevention and control deficiencies classified as not severe did not have any enforcement actions imposed or implemented, and 31 percent had enforcement actions imposed but not implemented—meaning the nursing home likely had an opportunity to correct the deficiency before an enforcement action was imposed.”

Source

If you or a loved one suffered injuries (or worse) while a resident of a nursing home in the United States due to an infection acquired in a nursing home, nursing home neglect, nursing home negligence, nursing home abuse, or nursing home fraud, you should promptly contact a local nursing home claim attorney in your state who may investigate your nursing home claim for you and file a nursing home claim on your behalf, if appropriate.

Visit our website to be connected with medical malpractice lawyers (nursing home claim lawyers) in your U.S. state who may assist you with your nursing home claim, or call us toll-free in the United States at 800-295-3959.

Turn to us when you don’t know where to turn.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, April 28th, 2021 at 5:30 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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